Sherwood Park School

Sherwood
Park
School

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Valuing the Individual, Celebrating Achievement, Learning for Life.

SHERWOOD PARK SCHOOL PUPIL PREMIUM GRANT EXPENDITURE       2018/19

 

Overview

Pupil Premium funding has been provided to ‘close the gap’ so that disadvantaged pupils progress as well as other pupils.

The indicator of pupils who are disadvantaged is those who are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) who are in Reception to Year 11. This also includes those who have ever been eligible for this in the last 6 years- known as the ‘Ever 6’ including Looked after Children = LAC

 

Number of pupils and Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) received

 

Total number of pupils on roll

116

Total number of pupils eligible for PPG

36 in total

18 pupils at Sherwood Park Campus

18 pupils at Sherwood Hill Campus

Amount of PPG received per pupil

£1320 Primary pupils

£935 Secondary pupils

£2300 Past LAC pupil

Total amount of PPG received

£37,060

 

Impact of  2017-18 Pupil Premium funding

 

% pupils who Met and Exceeded progress in their Personalised Learning Programme (PLP) targets 

 

 

Autumn Term 2017

(87 pupils)

Spring Term 2018

(89 pupils)

Summer Term 2018

(90 pupils)

 

Expected

Exceeded

Expected

Exceeded

Expected

Exceeded

Pupil Premium (PP) Pupils

 

 

      81%

 

 

     81%

 

      93%

 

      89%

 

      70%

 

     70%

Non Pupil Premium (NPP)

 

 

      84%

 

     74%

 

      74%

 

       64%

 

       90%

 

      79%

 

Assessing each Pupil’s PLP progress enables us to show progress in a wide range of areas including: English, Maths, Physical, Social and Emotional, Digitalised Learning, Independence skills, which gives a good overview of the overall progress of each pupil. It is important when looking at progress in our pupils to consider each pupil’s individual learning story, as there are often many complex intertwining factors that affect their progress.

Pupil Premium Pupils do better than Non Premium Pupils in the Spring Term, this demonstrates the impact of interventions that were put into place using Pupil Premium funding.

They do slightly less well in Autumn (3% less), when some interventions were still being organised. They also do slightly less well in the Summer (20% less). This may be due to several changes of teachers in two classes which affected the continuity and consistency of learning in 7 Pupil Premium pupils. Many pupils have Exceeded Expected progress. Pupil Premium funding has been used well to close the gap.

Two Looked After Children (LAC pupils)

Both pupils met Expected progress in all three terms of 2017-18.  One complex PMLD pupil met Expected progress in the Spring term and Exceed expected progress in the Autumn and Summer terms. The other pupil with ASD pupil has Exceeded expected progress in all 3 terms

PROJECTED SUMMARY OF PUPIL PREMIUM GRANT SPENDING 2018/19 

     

 

1.    Employment of a Play Therapist to support the emotional well-being of Pupil Premium pupils enabling them to engage with others (peers) more effectively and build trusting relationships with staff.  This will also enable them to work through issues related to their emotions, which they are not necessarily able to express in straight forward ways, leading to sustained good attendance and further increase their engagement and achievement in all areas of the curriculum.

1 day a week for 2 ½ terms

Projected spend of £9,720

 

2.    Employment of an Art Therapist to help provide children who find it difficult to communicate through speech to communicate with a new expressive language. They can use the art materials and their relationship with the art therapist to express feelings and emotions that are hard to put into words or signs. The often close bond with the art therapist gives children a safe place to communicate their feelings, allowing them to grow as individuals and understand themselves and their world better. However it can also act on a more basic level of learning social skills, looking after materials, gaining perseverance, and learning how to cope to resolve frustration.

1 day a week for 3 terms

Projected spend of £5, 041

 

3.    Employment of a Music Therapist to harness our pupil’s music-making abilities and develop their engagement and communication skills. This intervention is almost always active rather than passive, meaning that the student does not just listen to pleasant music, but is actively playing music in whatever way they can. The music therapist will listen carefully to the student and make music with the student that is closely matched to their playing. The student will realise, if their listening is engaged by the therapist, as the therapist is playing at the same moment as them. By engaging the student’s listening the therapist will be able to suggest changes (getting louder, slower etc.) by using the innate qualities of different types of music. Through being able to follow these changes and suggest their own, the student will increase their ability to have control, concentrate and develop their non-verbal communication.

1 day a week for 3 terms

Projected spend of £7,080

 

4.    Employment of a Parent Partnership worker to support our families.

This may involve: sign-posting to services, and if necessary support with engagement with these services e.g. health services, financial support services, charities, social care, other local authority agencies, parent support groups, leisure activities for young people. Meeting with families in to discuss and explore areas of difficulty experienced by students and/or family members and to develop a support plan to address these concerns. Work towards facilitating improved communication between parents and professionals or with other family members. Create opportunities for parents to meet with and support each other and share information about services and attend trainings through monthly coffee mornings.

Projected spend of £15,219

 

NB Many pupils may benefit from more than one area of funding use.

 

 

  Pupil Premium 2017/18

 Impact of Pupil Premium 2017-18

 

  Pupil Premium 2016/17